Information about weather and climate, daily surface maps, pictures and more.

 

The Pre-Holocene Climate Is Returning — And It Won't Be Fun

tornadotitans:

A very large lightning strike under a supercell thunderstorm near Canadian, TX on June 22, 2014. If you want to learn how to shoot lightning like a pro, you should check out our infographic we posted on our blog: http://ift.tt/1r9UWFe

tornadotitans:

A very large lightning strike under a supercell thunderstorm near Canadian, TX on June 22, 2014. If you want to learn how to shoot lightning like a pro, you should check out our infographic we posted on our blog: http://ift.tt/1r9UWFe

distant-traveller:

Milky Way rising above spectacular lightning display

The rise of the Milky Way and a spectacular lightning display in Mersing, Malaysia on June 28, 2014.

Image credit and copyright: Justin Ng

distant-traveller:

Milky Way rising above spectacular lightning display

The rise of the Milky Way and a spectacular lightning display in Mersing, Malaysia on June 28, 2014.

Image credit and copyright: Justin Ng

(Source: universetoday.com)

What makes a thunderstorm “severe”

sci-universe:

This is a new composite image which shows "fireworks" caused by a black hole in a nearby galaxy NGC 4258 (also known as M106). It features X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio waves from the VLA (purple), optical data from Hubble (yellow and blue), and infrared with Spitzer (red).
NGC 4258 is a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way, but it’s famous for something that our Galaxy doesn’t have – two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical, and radio light. These features, or anomalous arms, are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but instead intersect with it. There has now been made a new study by Patrick Ogle, Lauranne Lanz and Philip Appleton from the California Institute of Technology which is explaining those spectacles. Radio shows that the supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4258 is producing powerful jets of high-energy particles, and researchers think that these jets strike the disk of the galaxy and generate shock waves. (Full article here»)

sci-universe:

This is a new composite image which shows "fireworks" caused by a black hole in a nearby galaxy NGC 4258 (also known as M106). It features X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio waves from the VLA (purple), optical data from Hubble (yellow and blue), and infrared with Spitzer (red).

NGC 4258 is a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way, but it’s famous for something that our Galaxy doesn’t have – two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical, and radio light. These features, or anomalous arms, are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but instead intersect with it.
There has now been made a new study by Patrick Ogle, Lauranne Lanz and Philip Appleton from the California Institute of Technology which is explaining those spectacles. Radio shows that the supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4258 is producing powerful jets of high-energy particles, and researchers think that these jets strike the disk of the galaxy and generate shock waves. (Full article here»)

spaceplasma:

Bits and Pieces of the Cat’s Paw Nebula

This infrared view of the playfully named Cat’s Paw Nebula, otherwise known as NGC 6334 — taken by European Southern Observatory’s VISTA telescope, is a vast region of star formation about 5500 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Scorpius. VISTA views the skies in infrared, just outside what our eyes can see. The whole gas cloud is about 50 light-years across. In it, you can see a couple of soap-bubble features, places where the furious light and winds from young, massive stars have compressed the gas around them. 

  • More information: here

Credit: ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA